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Studies in Imperialism series

Prof. John M. MacKenzie
Author and Historian of Empire

   

Manchester University Press

Founding editor: John M. MacKenzie Current series editors:  Andrew Thompson, Professor of Global and Imperial History at Nuffield College, Oxford and Alan Lester, University of Sussex and LaTrobe University, Melbourne     

 

The Studies in Imperialism series was founded by John MacKenzie in 1984 to address the cultural history of empire. By 2016 it numbered more than 130 titles. The prime concern of the series remains the conviction that imperialism as a cultural phenomenon had as significant an effect on the dominant as on the subordinate societies. Cross-disciplinary work has appeared across the full spectrum of cultural phenomena, examining aspects of sex and gender, law, science, the environment, language and literature, migration, patriotic societies and much else. The series has always wished to present comparative work on American and European imperialism, and particularly welcomes the submission of books in these areas. The series continues to lead the way in encouraging the widest possible range of studies in the field. It always seeks to be at the cutting edge, responding to the current interests of scholars, and the needs of this ever- expanding area of historical research. Enquiries Enquiries/sales information regarding volumes in the MUP Studies in Imperialism series and other publications: Manchester University Press 176 Waterloo Place, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9GP United Kingdom Email: mup@manchester.ac.uk Tel.: +44 (0)161 275 2310 www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk
This book appraises the critical contribution of the Studies in Imperialism series to the writing of imperial histories as the series marked its 100th publication. Some of the most distinguished scholars writing today explore the major intellectual trends in Imperial history, with a particular focus on the cultural readings of empire that have flourished over the last generation. When the Studies in Imperialism series was founded, the discipline of Imperial history was at what was probably its lowest ebb. A quarter of a century on, there has been a tremendous broadening of the scope of what the study of empire encompasses. Essays in the volume consider ways in which the series and the wider historiography have sought to reconnect British and imperial histories; to lay bare the cultural expressions and registers of colonial power; and to explore the variety of experiences the home population derived from the empire.
Writing Imperial Histories, Andrew Thomson (ed.) MUP 2014
‘A fitting tribute to Professor MacKenzie's enormous contribution to modern imperial history. In the spirit of MacKenzie's expansive vision, this collection works both as a summation of his career and also as a stimulus to further research.’ Saul Dubow, Professor of History, Sussex University
Studies in imperialism